WILLOW SERIES - Artist interview with Nigel Eberthardt

 
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We have been inundated with positive feedback since we released the limited edition WILLOW SERIES, created by Tasmanian artist Nigel Eberhardt. And due to your response we thought you would love find out more about the prints and the artist!

The series features hand printed relief prints of a beautifully shaped willow tree stump that was left after the grand willow needed to be cut down, as it had sadly become unsafe. This beautiful tree was at least 80 years old and she had lent a certain charm to the garden and neighbourhood during those years. 

Each piece is hand printed in Turners Beach Tasmania, onto Japanese Shiramine Paper with premium oil based printing ink and is signed and numbered by the artist.

Keep scrolling to read about the printing process, why he loves nature and to see the process of how the prints are created. 

Shop WILLOW I here

Shop WILLOW II here

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Can you tell us about The Willow Series?

The Willow series is a collection of relief prints taken from an old willow tree that sadly succumbed to rot. My wife and her family held a strong connection with this tree, being a predominate feature of their family home. 

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Can you tell us about the creative process you go through when printing?

Nature is full of imperfections and trying to capture this through relief printing is a challenge. The creative process starts well before the ink is on the paper. The preparation of the stump provides full creative control over how the final image will look. By removing the spring growth, a groove is created in the stump. The more spring growth I remove, the more contrast is achieved when the ink is applied. When I am creating the prints the pressure that is applied to different areas of the stump affects the feel of the final piece. Using my hands I apply varied pressure to the paper to transfer the ink. The end result is something that feels organic. It is this that I find most rewarding, no two prints are ever the same.

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What can we expect next from you?

The relief prints tell the story of the tree. Each negative space in the print (white)  represents the Spring of that year. In a way I feel like I'm able to give the tree a voice. I am currently in the planning stages of going into the isolated old growth forests of Tasmania and capturing the stump of a giant tree. Tasmania is home to the largest hardwood trees in the world and the tallest flowering plants. To tell the story of one would be amazing.

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Who are your favourite artists/designers/architects at the moment?

Raymond Arnold. Raymond’s work reflects the construction of the Tasmania landscape, in particular that of the west coast; I could spend hours admiring at his prints.

My wife and I are beginning to start work on designing our second family home and it is hard not to be inspired by the work of architects Glenn Murcutt and John Wardle.

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BEFORE: the beautiful Willow Tree.

BEFORE: the beautiful Willow Tree.

 

Introducing Ruthie L Designs...

 

We are excited to introduce you to ruthie L. designs, a textile and rug design studio which is launching its phenomenal debut rug and wall art collections!  With a focus on utilising the highest quality materials and ethically creating truly unique pieces, ruthie L. designs is excited to unveil The Secrets of Nature Rug Collection.dot

Founded by accomplished art expert, surface designer and artist Ruth Lazerson, ruthie L. designs creates made-to-order pieces that are perfectly crafted to bring together the cohesive interior design of a space.

We had the pleasure of chatting with Ruthie about all things rugs, interiors and style... keep scrolling for the interview!

Can you tell us about Ruthie L Designs and how it was started?

ruthie L. designs was started early in 2015 as a textile design studio. My initial intention was to license my designs and patterns however what I really wanted to be doing was designing and actually producing artisan made, two- dimensional works of art. My natural artistic style is very fluid, organic and textural and I’m passionate about textiles so rugs are a natural canvas for my work.

I think my company and my work is really an extension of myself and who I am. It represents everything I stand for – integrity and ethical responsibility first and foremost but also a personal need for beauty, harmony, serenity and understated elegance.

Can you tell us about the creative process you go through when designing?

I absolutely love to paint and play around with textures, layers, colours and various artistic mediums and materials so that is usually how the creative process starts for me. I put on some old school music (my 14 year old would cringe at that), grab a cup of tea and reach for my brush or stick or whatever I’m using to make marks and see where it takes me. Once that is finished, I then scan the artwork into the computer and play with it in Photoshop or Illustrator. I then convert that into a suitable CAD to be used to make the rug pattern to be used by the weavers.

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Where did your love of design come from?

I’ve always loved beautiful things but especially textiles, rugs and artworks. I started collecting them when I was about 20 and I’m still collecting!

How would you describe your style? 

My artistic style is quite abstract, free-flowing, fluid and highly textured. If I do design something like a flower, it never really looks like a flower but rather makes reference to a flower with the focus on the line and the texture of a flower. It is suggestive of a flower but is by no means a perfect flower! I generally prefer soft, muted and neutral colours and I think that makes my work quite serene and understated.

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Top 3 styling tips?

1.    Rugs don’t always have to be rectangular – be creative and open to having a round or square rug if the space lends itself to it.

2.    Rugs are a great way to define spaces like a sitting room or dining room, especially in a small place.

3.    And finally, my favourite one – use a beautiful rug as a piece of art to dress up a big empty wall. It will bring texture, warmth and colour into the space and will most likely make a bold statement.

What can we expect next for Ruthie L Designs?

It’s been a very busy year at ruthie L. designs. I’ve have just opened my new showroom, I will be launching my debut rug collection “Secrets of Nature” at the Décor + Design Show in Melbourne in July and I am currently designing and developing a beautiful range of embroidered textiles so watch this space!

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What do you think is the key to great design?  

For me great design comes from the heart. Being true to oneself and really knowing ones own natural style and “handwriting” can only produce great work.

Who are your favourite designers/bloggers/artists for inspiration at the moment?

That is a tough question – there are so many inspirational people out there! I’m loving The Style Files, Design Sponge and Miss Moss, Caravanaire which I follow on Instagram, Design Seeds for colour inspiration, The Ruggist for all things rugs and carpets and I need my daily dose of positive vibes from Business Chicks and Creative Women’s Circle … oh and Dot + Pop of course!

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