Toast & Honey Studio... Designer Pots, Prints and Plywood

 

Toast & Honey Studio is a Melbourne based design studio specialising in pots, prints and plywood, created and designed by owner Maria who has a background in Architecture and design. After following her passion and a longing for a better work life balance, she left architecture behind and started on her new journey, so say hello to Toast & Honey Studio

Her pieces are modern in style, simplistic in their approach and are made to the highest standard. With a range of styles, sizes and colours, there is a Toast & Honey pot for everyone - the hard part will be not buying them all! 

I sat down with Maria over a cup of coffee and we chatted all things interiors, design, greenery and then I got distracted and started talking architecture and picking her brain for tips and tricks!

Scroll down to read our chat and see more of her beautiful pots...  and SHOP here!

Toast & Honey Studio

Tell us about Toast & Honey...

I actually studied Architecture and graduated in 2004. After working in Melbourne for a few years, my husband, Jonathan, and I moved to London. It was only meant to be a year long adventure but London became our home for the next 6 years!

It was a life changing experience; we made life-long friends and travelled throughout Europe, discovering new cultures and exploring diverse architecture and design.

Soon after our first daughter was born, we returned to Melbourne and I began to seek a better work/life balance. That's when Toast & Honey studio was born; I was able to still be creative, doing something I love, while spending more time with my family.

Toast & Honey Studio

What is the creative process you go through when designing and painting your pots?

My creative process is quite organic and heavily influenced by my background in architecture and love for modernist design. I draw inspiration from everywhere; a striking pattern, a new colour I love, the feel of a space I like where I think a pot would be complimentary.  I sketch my ideas on paper and then convert them to a design that would suit the proportions of my pots.

How would you describe your style?

Refreshing, refined, timeless, unique yet adaptable to most interiors.

Toast & Honey Studio

What do you think is the key to great design?  

A functional approach, simplicity, clean lines and confidence.
 

Who are your favourite designers/bloggers/artists for inspiration?

There are so many but the following are a stand out:

 -Architect Prineas; an australian architecture firm. I love their use of materials, the forms they design and the way they bring light into the spaces they create.

-Made by Morgen; A Melbourne based furniture design company. Their products are refined and inspired from mid century scandinavian design, which I love.

Toast & Honey Studio

Top 3 styling tips?

1.     Always include greenery.

2.     Use lots of different textures.

3.     Keep it simple.

Toast & Honey Studio

What can we expect next for Toast & Honey?

I will be launching a new pot shape in the new year, which will include a smaller size.

Also, Toast & Honey studio will be moving to a new home; a collaborative retail space. It will include a workshop which will be shared with other local creatives.

Toast & Honey Studio

Shop online HERE or find a stockist near you HERE.

 
Source: Toast & Honey Studio is a Melbourne based ...

WILLOW SERIES - Artist interview with Nigel Eberthardt

 
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We have been inundated with positive feedback since we released the limited edition WILLOW SERIES, created by Tasmanian artist Nigel Eberhardt. And due to your response we thought you would love find out more about the prints and the artist!

The series features hand printed relief prints of a beautifully shaped willow tree stump that was left after the grand willow needed to be cut down, as it had sadly become unsafe. This beautiful tree was at least 80 years old and she had lent a certain charm to the garden and neighbourhood during those years. 

Each piece is hand printed in Turners Beach Tasmania, onto Japanese Shiramine Paper with premium oil based printing ink and is signed and numbered by the artist.

Keep scrolling to read about the printing process, why he loves nature and to see the process of how the prints are created. 

Shop WILLOW I here

Shop WILLOW II here

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Can you tell us about The Willow Series?

The Willow series is a collection of relief prints taken from an old willow tree that sadly succumbed to rot. My wife and her family held a strong connection with this tree, being a predominate feature of their family home. 

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Can you tell us about the creative process you go through when printing?

Nature is full of imperfections and trying to capture this through relief printing is a challenge. The creative process starts well before the ink is on the paper. The preparation of the stump provides full creative control over how the final image will look. By removing the spring growth, a groove is created in the stump. The more spring growth I remove, the more contrast is achieved when the ink is applied. When I am creating the prints the pressure that is applied to different areas of the stump affects the feel of the final piece. Using my hands I apply varied pressure to the paper to transfer the ink. The end result is something that feels organic. It is this that I find most rewarding, no two prints are ever the same.

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What can we expect next from you?

The relief prints tell the story of the tree. Each negative space in the print (white)  represents the Spring of that year. In a way I feel like I'm able to give the tree a voice. I am currently in the planning stages of going into the isolated old growth forests of Tasmania and capturing the stump of a giant tree. Tasmania is home to the largest hardwood trees in the world and the tallest flowering plants. To tell the story of one would be amazing.

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Who are your favourite artists/designers/architects at the moment?

Raymond Arnold. Raymond’s work reflects the construction of the Tasmania landscape, in particular that of the west coast; I could spend hours admiring at his prints.

My wife and I are beginning to start work on designing our second family home and it is hard not to be inspired by the work of architects Glenn Murcutt and John Wardle.

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BEFORE: the beautiful Willow Tree.

BEFORE: the beautiful Willow Tree.